Posts Tagged ‘Song Kang-ho’

What’s Korean Cinema? 26 – Memories Of Murder

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Based on the true story of Korean’s first serial killer, Kenny B and Hangul Celluloid’s Paul Quinn look back on Bong Joon-ho’s critically acclaimed and audience juggernaut Memories Of Murder.

Running Times: 
00m 00s – Intro/Production-background
12m 30s – Bong Joon-ho biography & discussion
37m 50s – Memories Of Murder review

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What’s Korean Cinema? 20 – Secret Sunshine

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From a director who makes the most out of his sporadic filmmaking, we find Lee Chang-dong directing a lead performance with enough acting for 3 movies. So is his 140 minute drama Secret Sunshine from 2007, about grief, belief and emotional trauma worth the investment. Or do we need to watch vidoes of puppies to cleanse? Find out with Kenny B and Hangul Celluloid‘s Paul Quinn.

Running Times: 
00m 00s – Intro/Lee Chang-dong bio & discission
28m 52s – Song Kang-ho and Yeon Do-jeon discussion
36m 10s – Secret Sunshine review

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group or Twitter (@podcastonfire@sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed.

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What’s Korean Cinema? 6: The Good, The Bad And The Weird & The Last Stand

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Stoo and Andy team up with Mass Moviecide UK’s Trevor to discuss 2008’s The Good, The Bad And The Weird and 2013’s The Last Stand, both from director Kim Ji-wun!  Stoo also catches up with Korean Cinema guru Paul Quinn from Hangul Celluloid to gets his opinion on the double bill at hand. Stay tuned after the credits for off-mic and very off-topic banter from the crew!

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group (NEW) or Twitter (@podcastonfire, @sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed.

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Thirst (2009)

Veteran actor  Song Kang-Ho plays the role of Sang-hyun, a catholic priest who helps anyone in need. He takes part in a trip to South Africa, donating his body to science. Contracting a deadly virus, Sang-hyun receives a blood transfusion which infuses him with a great energy and a uncontrollable lust for blood.

Upon his return to Korea he’s reunited with childhood friends Tae-Ju and Kang-Woo, who are now grown up and became a “married” couple. The couple live with Kangs mother, the hostess of the weekly mahjong games. Each night Tae-Ju spends the night running through the quiet streets, running from her troubles in life and her shame of a marriage.

An intimate affair between Sang-hyun and Tae-Ju emerages. Read the rest of this entry »

Thirst gets a UK Cinema Release

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The recently merged Palisade|Tartan have the rights to Park Chan-Wooks “Thirst” starring Song Kang-Ho. The Premier is on the 2nd October in London. Then released at selected cinemas Friday 16th October. Then we can expect a DVD in the New Year!

UK DVD Releases; Oasis & No. 3

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The latest two releases from UK DVD label Third Window Films include the acclaimed Lee Chang-Dong drama “Oasis” and the Before they were famous flick No.3 starring most of Koreas top actors before thier breakout roles!

Oasis: Korean director Lee Chang-dong’s drama begins on the day that Jong-du (Sol Kyung-gu), a mentally handicapped young man, is released from prison. He is immediately arrested again for being unable to pay a restaurant bill, and his brother bails him out and sets him up with a menial job and a place to live. The crime that originally landed Jong-du in prison was a hit-and-run accident that resulted in the death of an old man. One day he goes to visit the victim’s family, and meets Gong-ju (Moon So-ri), the man’s daughter, who has cerebral palsy. After a disastrous first meeting, the two begin an unlikely love affair that exposes the callousness and uncomfortable secrets of both of their families.

No. 3: Writer Song Neung-Han made his directorial debut with this South Korean crime drama about sharp-witted young gangster Tae-Ju (Han Suk-Kyu) whose bar-hostess wife (Lee Mi-Yun) takes both poetry lessons and love sessions from a local poet. Meanwhile, Tae-Ju realizes he’s only No. 3 in the pecking order of his urban gang, a situation that means competing with stupid tough Ashtray (named after his weapon of choice). Resentment re Japanese dominance, police corruption, and other serious themes surface as the industrial hip-hop music leads the storyline toward a conclusion set in the 21st Century. Shown at the 1998 Vancouver Film Festival.

You can purchase both here; Oasis and No. 3

The Host (2006)

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Plot: Gang-Du is a middle aged father who spends his days sleeping in his food stall by the Han River, the stall is owned by his father. Despite his flaws his father believes that Gang-Du is a good son/father. Their lives are suddenly turned upside down when a giant mutated amphibian (It looks like a mixture of a Toad and cat fish and acrobatic skills of Tarzan rolled into one) emerges from the river. Read the rest of this entry »

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