Posts Tagged ‘Choi Min-Sik’

What’s Korean Cinema? 37 – Shiri

The characters try and prevent South Korea from going boom but 1999’s Shiri went boom commercially and perhaps without the spark it set off commercially, Korean cinema would look a lot different today. The new Korean cinema wave starts here. With Kenny B and Hangul Celluloid’s Paul Quinn.

Running Times: 
00m 00s – Intro/Shiri production background.
33m 00s – Notes on director Kang Je-gyu,
37m 05s – Han Suk-kyu biography/discussion.
62m 25s – Shiri review.

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group or Twitter (@podcastonfire@sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed.

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What’s Korean Cinema? 36 – Springtime

Choi Min-sik may say he’s a bad guy in Springtime but this is as far removed from any scenes involving hammers or eating live animals on screen. No, Choi Min-sik gets taken down a notch, brought into warmth in Ryu Jang-ha’s 2004 drama. With Kenny B and Paul Quinn of Hangul Celluloid.

Running Times: 
00m 00s – Intro/Ryu Jang-ha bio/discussion.
18m 33s – Choi Min-sik bio/discussion.
47m 35s – Springtime review.

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group or Twitter (@podcastonfire@sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed.

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Podcast On Fire 250: Shock Wave

The versatile, productive and often always interesting Herman Yau can work any genre and for 2017’s Shock Wave, he gives us Andy Lau’s bomb disposal officer vs Mainland terrorists out for revenge. Kenny B goes solo and also shares some recent viewing- and gaming experiences. Including thoughts on the conclusion of a long anime TV-series.

Shock Wave is out now on dvd and digital in the UK from CineAsia.

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group or Twitter (@podcastonfire@sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed. Music courtesy of Brian Kirby (briankirby.net) whose awesome clothing line you can find at shelflifeclothing.com.

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What’s Korean Cinema? 7: A Bittersweet Life & I Saw The Devil

WhatsKoreanCinema07

Stoo, Easy A & Mass Moviecide UK’s Trevor return for What’s Korean Cinema #7 – More Hunky Buns (and more Kim Ji-wun love)! We discuss A Bittersweet Life and I Saw The Devil And Fucked Her. Wait, no sorry it’s I Saw the Devil from 2010. During the tea break, Stoo hops on the line with Paul Quinn from Hangul Celluloid to get his take on the films.

Contact the show via email at podcastonfire at googlemail.com, on our Facebook page and Facebook group (NEW) or Twitter (@podcastonfire, @sogoodreviews) and SUBSCRIBE to our iTunes feed.

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UK DVD Releases; Oasis & No. 3

thirdwindowfilmreleases

The latest two releases from UK DVD label Third Window Films include the acclaimed Lee Chang-Dong drama “Oasis” and the Before they were famous flick No.3 starring most of Koreas top actors before thier breakout roles!

Oasis: Korean director Lee Chang-dong’s drama begins on the day that Jong-du (Sol Kyung-gu), a mentally handicapped young man, is released from prison. He is immediately arrested again for being unable to pay a restaurant bill, and his brother bails him out and sets him up with a menial job and a place to live. The crime that originally landed Jong-du in prison was a hit-and-run accident that resulted in the death of an old man. One day he goes to visit the victim’s family, and meets Gong-ju (Moon So-ri), the man’s daughter, who has cerebral palsy. After a disastrous first meeting, the two begin an unlikely love affair that exposes the callousness and uncomfortable secrets of both of their families.

No. 3: Writer Song Neung-Han made his directorial debut with this South Korean crime drama about sharp-witted young gangster Tae-Ju (Han Suk-Kyu) whose bar-hostess wife (Lee Mi-Yun) takes both poetry lessons and love sessions from a local poet. Meanwhile, Tae-Ju realizes he’s only No. 3 in the pecking order of his urban gang, a situation that means competing with stupid tough Ashtray (named after his weapon of choice). Resentment re Japanese dominance, police corruption, and other serious themes surface as the industrial hip-hop music leads the storyline toward a conclusion set in the 21st Century. Shown at the 1998 Vancouver Film Festival.

You can purchase both here; Oasis and No. 3

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The Podcast On Fire Network aims to provide a large, continually expanding overview of Asian cinema. On the flagshow Podcast On Fire, the big guns out of Hong Kong cinema gets a spotlight through discussion and review while the remainder of the network shows gives you insight into Japanese, Korean, Taiwanese cinema and the history of adult oriented Hong Kong cinema!

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