Romeo Must Die (2000)

A modern day interpretation of the Shakespeare classic ‘Romeo & Julliet’ (Hence the title). Han Sing (Jet Li), an ex-cop sent to prison to take the wrap for his young brother and father, to whom are both Hong Kong Crime lords. His father and his brother both move to San Francisco to escape their troubles.

After hearing about the death of his younger brother, he escapes from prison and gets the first plane to the San Francisco. Han’s main objective is to find out why and who killed his brother and then avenge his death. Although he meets a sassy young girl name Trish. Trish is the daughter of Business man (Delroy Lindo) who is doing deals with Hans father. Although members of both groups are being killed off, which is stirring up some trouble between the two businesses. But can Han avenge his brother and solve these gang murders?

First of, Romeo must die is a decent film, but it just took some wrong turns. I’m not too keen on the semi-Rap Hip/R & B Cast. If they actually had black actors such as Wesley Snipes, it would benefit the film in my opinion. Yet Delroy Lindo and Anthony Anderson suited their roles perfectly.

Second point is the wire use in the films, I think the scenes with the extravagant wire use were unnecessary, I’m sure most of the stuff would have been able to be done with out. But I guess it saves time putting them on the strings.

Acting wise, Jet Li was good, I really enjoyed his innocent, loveable character. Of course Aaliyah didn’t show any flaws. Anthony Anderson was the comical relief and boy does he make me laugh. He was the only reason I enjoyed the Cradle 2 The Grave, to be brutally honest.

All and all ‘Romeo Must Die’ was a nice beginning to Jet Li’s American films, although if feels like Cradle 2 The Grave has spoiled it. I’m just keeping my fingers crossed for 2005’s “Unleashed”.

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