China Strike Force (2000)

ChinaStrikeForce

Plot: Young Cops, Darren (Aaron Kwok) and Alex (Lee Hom-Wang) are part of an elite group known as Team 808, their objective is to stop all international drug smuggling into China.

Add Tony Lau (Mark Dacascos) the son of Hong Kong crimelord Ma (Lau Siu-Ming), Tony has hooked up with a street wise american coccain dealer – Coolio (rapper/crap actor Coolio). Tony and Coolio plan on bringing cocaine against Ma’s orders.

What brings them together? How about a tall, busty Japanese woman (Fujiwara Noriko) who seems to be working for Tony, but does she have her own motives?

Review: Right away I must warn you that this is a Hong Kong movie fully filmed in English. Yes, half of the cast speak english (more broken than others) and the half dubbed over.

The movie is ridden with buddy cop cliches, which as you can expect is rather cheesy. Some moments I admit to giggling too, when Aaron Kwok is tripping over his tongue looking at Fujiwara Noriko. The film is filled with cool hard hitting stunts, the fight scenes were also not half bad, but there is some wire work flung in there.

Possibly the biggest crime is that Operation Scorpio actor/phenomanol martial artist Kim Won-Jin is killed off early on in the movie. He has one fight scene with Aaron Kwok on the top of a tour bus. He’s later killed by Coolio, I would have giving this movie a 10/10 rating if it was the other way about – Kim Won Jin killing Coolio, over and over and over.

Some familiar faces pop up in this movie, Ken Lo as a bleach blonde henchman, Lau Siu-Ming as Uncle Ma and Paul Chun as the sherif.

Final thoughts, the film isn’t worth owning, but still it’s worth one watch, then you can break the disc and shout “Why!? Stanley, Why!?”

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